Category Archives: give back

what does it mean to be a global citizen?

What does it mean to be a Global Citizen?  Is it just about living in different places, exploring unfamiliar cultures? In an effort to understand the concept and how we may differ in defining it, I’ve asked for input from journalists and Reiki Masters, expats, veterans, an octogenarian and even a middle-schooler. Their answers may surprise you. 

I’ve long held a  belief in travel as a catalyst for transformation. But, often wonder if travel alone is what imbues one with a sense of contentedness. What I found in researching this piece is that travel is not necessarily the common thread, it may be something deeper. 

The following are unedited quotes given by a wide range of people, of varying ages with a tapestry of backgrounds and life experience. Some have never traveled beyond the borders of the United States, while others are global nomads. Is there a commonality in how they’ve responded to the question, “What does it mean to be a Global Citizen?”

What Does It Mean To Be A Global Citizen? 

 

“When you become a global citizen, you stop seeing people’s race and color, your home is where you are currently located, your interest in people’s culture and background is genuine and you sort of want to be a part of their experience. You stop judging people. Instead of judging, you ask such questions as “why they do things differently, why they eat different food, and wear different clothes, and behave differently in some situations.” As a citizen of the world, you look for similarities instead of differences, or try to tear down the borders instead of building them up; and then, at the end of it all, you realize how alike we all really are.”  

~ Svetlana G. (International businesswoman who has lived in Russia, Germany, Peru, Ukraine, and the US. Speaker of four languages, currently working on her fifth)

“My dad joined the military when I was 7, and it was the most important decision he ever made for our family. While the military generally skews conservative, it opened us up to experiencing people, places, religions, food, music, etc. we would never have had we stayed in Arkansas, where both my parents were born and raised. 

All that to say, being a global citizen isn’t just a progressive/liberal mindset. I’m extremely liberal now but grew up rather conservatively. Being a global citizen, at the very least, means being aware that there are other people, countries, religions, other than your own. Of course, a more progressive mindset takes it a step further, considering how the actions of our government and our own actions impact others. That is also the difference between being a global citizen and a GOOD global citizen.”

~ Brent A.  (Graphic Designer, advocate, author, blogger, husband and father) 

 “I’ve tried to teach my four kids that because they’re had access to great opportunity in the US doesn’t mean they’re entitled to success. And it certainly doesn’t mean that people who have had less opportunities are less worthy of succeeding. As the great Barry Switzer said, “Some people are born on third base and go through life thinking they hit a triple.” I try to instill a sense of gratitude, responsibility, and respect for all cultures.”

~ Lindsay M.  (Mom, DIYer, advocate, author, and wife of a musician) 

“A Global Citizen to me is someone who does not feel the boundaries of certain areas and has the sense of responsibility to be wary and cautious of the land and world around them. They know what needs to be done to take care of this world and they act upon it.” 

~ Tyler B. W. (Surfer, rapper, dog-dad, husband, and currently serving United States Marine)

“Having respect and compassion for people of different cultures within our borders and beyond. Recognizing that we are all of the same world and taking care of that earth and its occupants together.”

~ Julie C. (Journalist, travel expert, wife, mother and Doxie lover) 

“Global Citizenship means, connection. I have been blessed to travel and live in other countries, this has allowed me to experience different cultures and traditions.    I choose to believe that we are connected to each other by and invisible thread that I call God/Spirit.  We all share the same responsibility of nurturing and protecting the land/sea/air for future generations.  I have found although our traditions and cultures differ our consequences to this planet has an overall impact on the rest of us.”

~ Carolyn G. (Seeker, singer, mother, wife, former British expat now U.S. Citizen)

“Being in touch with the rest of the world and having concern/interest in all of our Human race brothers and sisters. None of us had a choice as to which country we would belong to when we were born.”

~ Robin R. (Manufacturing Executive, father, husband, mountain biker and veteran) 

“Global citizens feel at home in multiple locations as they roam the world, and feel the sense of belonging to others despite their cultural, racial, societal or economic or other differences. They thrive on learning new things and appreciate local cultures. At the same time – their own roots can weaken and their own cultural habits diminish as they learn and adapt to other cultures. At best global citizenship is when you teach your own culture to others as well learn from others.”

~ Katja P. (Author, Editor, expat, mother, influencer, photographer, entrepreneur, global nomad) 

“Sending aid to victims of the Mexican earthquake the same as you do the victims of Harvey or Irma. Feeling empathy towards the Palestinians and the various African people starving due to drought and war. Recognizing and celebrating the connectedness of all people from wherever they originate. And whatever your beliefs are about your creator and whatever the person on the exact opposite side of the planet (or city or state or country) believes about the creator, it is the same being. Remember that in dealing with your brothers and sisters from across the globe. And maybe someday from across the galaxy.”

~ Kevin H. (Financial planner, singer and husband)

“It means we are all on this big rock (Earth) together and we are all connected in some way even if it is only by the internet. It means knowing that we may not all agree but we will need each other at some point. Our differences can slip away over the common ground of a basic need of survival or compassion for one another. The only place that I have traveled out of the USA mainland is to Vieques, Puerto Rico. Having seen the beauty of the island and of the people, I am extremely concerned about the recent hurricanes they have been sustaining. How will this impact their way of life and the island. I am more connected having actually been there because I have first-hand knowledge of the kindness of the people who live there.

It is important not to be or become desensitized to others around the world because when we do, we become desensitized to our basic humanity.”

~ Beth F (Nurse, homeopathic wellness expert, Reiki Master) 

“It means one who is dedicated to stewardship of our planet while seeking education for them self and others through kindness and compassion.” 

~ Sarah Jane C.  (gardener, reader, enjoying life at 81 years young)

“It is when you care about people because they are people and the earth because we share it.” 

~ Emily D. (11-year-old traveler, lover of dance and her French Bulldog)

I came away from this little experiment in social consciousness with an unexpectedly profound revelation and more questions.  With such a diverse group it seemed logical that the responses would have a wide range. Yet, they really don’t. 

We seem to have an innate understanding of our own connection to one another and to our planet. Whether we’ve seen much of the world or rarely ventured beyond our hometown, we feel a sense of community in our shared humanity. But do we foster that connection, act on it, practice the understanding we have? If we don’t, why not?

In a time where so many forces seek to polarize or isolate, I see hope in our understanding of what it means to be a global citizen. With that said, I also wonder how we turn that knowledge into action. How do we move beyond answering the question and becoming true global citizens through action?  

This week I’m in New York city attending my second travel bloggers summit on study abroad and global citizenship. It is my hope to find ways – both big and small – that can help us all take meaningful action on behalf of each other. 

If you’d like to take part, follow along on social media using #StudyAbroadBecause 

don’t thank me for my service

Grills are firing up, traffic is piling up, and the cost of a mattress is dropping. It must mean that Memorial Day is nearly upon us. As you hang a flag or pack a bag I ask that you also remember what the day is intended to celebrate and… don’t thank me for my service. 

If you’ve read this blog much you may know that I’m a Navy veteran and the mother of a currently serving Marine. Causes that support veterans and service members are near and dear to my heart. You could say that one of the common threads in all of my storytelling is pulled from this experience. I feel it is my duty to raise a voice for my sisters and brothers at arms past, present, and future.

Memorial Day is one of the most misunderstood of the days set aside to honor those who serve. For example, did you know that it was first celebrated in 1868 as Decoration Day? No, it wasn’t the day Lilly Pulitzer’s ancestors created the first pineapple decorated sandal.  It was a day set aside to remember those lost in the civil war.

In 1971, amid war and loss, the day now known as Memorial Day became an official federal holiday intended to be a remembrance of those who had given all in service to this nation. Not all those that served but rather the countless many who had lost their lives for the freedoms we enjoy as citizens of these United States. 

Somewhere in the decades between we have let the solemnity of the day be pushed aside in favor of three-day weekends and the unofficial start of summer. Few of us find our way to places of mourning to pay respect to those whose blood has paved the path of our freedom. Still others of us, well-intentioned though we may be, misunderstand the sentiment of honoring loss and turn to thank the living for their service.   

While I appreciate your gratitude, a part of me rails against it on this day. I have lost those I knew, their loss is fresh again when you share thanks for my service on Memorial Day. I served. I did not die. This day is not for me, nor my son, nor my extended family of veterans and the currently serving Marines I consider family. It is for the families of the fallen, for the widow who sees flags fly on Memorial Day, each one of them an echo of a flag-draped coffin.  It is for the tears shed by loved ones across the decades that built this nation. It is a day of collective mourning and gratitude. 

Don’t misunderstand me, I am not here to tell you that you’re wrong in hosting that BBQ or heading to the beach. I just ask that you take a moment away from your celebrations to send one up in remembrance of those who gave all that you may truly enjoy this time together. 

If you’d like to thank a veteran, do that on Veteran’s Day. If you want to thank a currently serving member of any branch of our military (though we all know the Navy is the best,) Armed Forces Day is the day to do that. Should you be so inclined as to want to do more than just say thank you, support programs that help support our military and their families.  Here are a few of my favorites;

American Widow Project

Operation Delta Dog

Bob Woodruff Foundation

United Services Organization 

Operation Welcome Home (Maryland) 

Fisher House Foundation

Vail Veterans Project

Want to visit a veteran’s cemetery to say thank you? Here is a way to locate one near you. 

 

2017 Mazda CX9 Grand Touring: A Driver’s Dream?

I like to drive. You might have deduced this from the number of car reviews you find here on The Nuggets or the years that I contributed to automotive publications. Every once in a while a car comes along that makes that love deepen. The 2017 Mazda CX9 Grand Touring might just be The One. 

Through my continued collaboration with the folks at DriveShop, I was able to spend a week with the 2017 Mazda CX9 Grand Touring AWD. I would like to thank Mazda USA for also allowing us to give back to the Assateague Island Alliance.

The alliance is a charity we support that helps preserve the wild horse population of Assateague Island as well as its unique environment. Part of our extended test drive included a visit to the island that you can see in the video below.


 

Let’s get one thing out of the way right up front… I love this car. Typically any car review I write comes with a robust list of pros and cons because really all cars have their faults. Or rather I feel that were I designing them I could have done a much better job, duh!  So, I prepare you in advance that is review will have a very small list of cons. 

5 Things Reasons to Love the 2017 Mazda CX9 Grand Touring (AWD) 

Handling – Crossovers aren’t as clunky as mini-vans when it comes to handling but it’s a close second in most cases. While this car doesn’t quite reach the performance levels of the limited edition Corvette I zoomed around South Florida in a few years back, it still handles like a sports car. Acceleration is seamless, steering smooth and breaking a breeze. 

Tech – From audio app integration (hello, Pandora!) to both iOS and Android carplay compatibility, this car is a techie dream. MAZDA CONNECT – their proprietary the infotainment system – lets you own the road and still be connected. Really if you’re at all the road tripping type this is the ultimate. 

Safety – Advanced blind spot monitoring, lane departure warning, and smart break support are just the little things in the safety package. Mazda steps up their game with the addition of smart break support just for city driving (we break more in traffic), lane assist (stay in your own lane, bud!), distance recognition support (no riding tails anymore), roll stability and even automatic emergency notification. Top all that off with a camera system that essentially gives you a 360 view and even lousy parallel parkers like me are safe and sound.  

Room (SO. MUCH. ROOM) – Most cars with third-row seating either come with only enough leg room for passengers born with disproportionally short legs or just enough cargo space for a sack of potatoes. With the CX9 Grand Touring Mazda has cracked the code and given you both. 

Easy one-handed controls allow you to configure seating with ease giving extra cargo space when needed and a comfortable amount of space when using all seating options.

Style – This car is sexy! The driver’s side feels like a cockpit. Leather wrapped steering wheel, dual lighting for the vanity mirrors, a center console that feels like a lounge, all contribute to a sense of style that is echoed in the lines of the body. 

This car is packed with pros but it has a few cons too, starting with the navigation. While I love all the tech offered, and especially the heads up display that projects speed and directions onto the windshield,  the navigation system is not intuitive. We spent a week with this car and failed to fully figure it out.  

The fuel efficiency is great on the highway but could be better in the city. It isn’t bad though by any stretch. Price point is a bit of sticker-shock. The average cost for the base model of the grand touring awd comes in around $40,500. I will say though that after our drive was over and I went back to our car, I quickly resigned that I’d be more than willing to pay that be driving the Mazda again. 

Beyond the use of the vehicle and a gift card for the charity, I haven’t been compensated for this post. Like all my reviews of cars (or anything) all opinions are my own. 

Dog Wisdom

This past weekend was a cold and dreary one along the Chesapeake bay. The weather brought with it a bit of unease and melancholia. Self-medicating seemed in order.

I spent part of the day in Downtown Annapolis, just me and the pup. The kids had slept late and Marc didn’t feel like going out in the rain. While feeding the ducks a man approached. He asked if he could pet Gordon. Gordy loves that, little attention junkie that he is.

While we talked about the dog and the dog did all his cute moves to get more pets the man shared how much he loved being around dogs. He said, “dogs never think twice about being nice. They seem to know if they are good to you you’ll be nice back. Sad that doesn’t always work out for them.” He thanked me, rubbed Gordy’s head and walked away only to turn around and head back.

He then said he hated to ask but he was homeless and hungry and wondered if I had some change to spare. Without thinking twice I handed him a $20. I tend to be very wary of panhandlers having seen more than one head off for a fix. He could have been intending to do the same thing but I realized in that moment it wasn’t my place to judge. I could do a nice thing because it was nice and leave it at that.

A dog doesn’t care if you’re rich or poor, educated or illiterate, clever or dull. Give him your heart and he will give you his. ~ John Grogan

Heading back to the car I heard someone call, “Hey, Gordon’s mom!” I looked across the street and it was the same guy with a big bag full of sandwiches from Jimmy Johns. He smiled and said, “thanks for understanding.”

Sometimes dogs teach us how to be better humans.

random acts of kindness apps

random acts of kindness there's an app for thatKindness is the the best investment. Think about it, how good do you feel right after you’ve done something – big or small-– for someone else? See, just thinking about it paid dividends in you feel good all over again. Right? Investing in kindness is even easier thanks to tech. Check out these ways random acts of kindness apps, websites and tech tools. 

Walk The Dog

I love this one because it has so many layers. Walking your dog is good for you and them. With Walk for a Dog, Woof Trax is making it your walk good for dogs living in shelters too.

Whether it’s a walk around the block or that epic hike you’ve been gearing up for, every walk counts. Download their app, and use it every time you grab for the leash, and Woof Trax donates to one of 6,000 shelters across the country!

Get Those Steps In

Sure, hitting your daily steps goal is great but it can do good for others too. Charity Miles partners with corporate sponsors to make those steps add up to cold hard cash for charity.  Just download the app, fill out your profile and get moving. Bikers earn up to 10¢ per mile; walkers and runners earn up to 25¢ per mile, and it all goes to the cause of your choosing from a long list of participating organizations.

So what charities can you help by getting in your daily workout? Organizations like; Habitat for Humanity, (red), Autism Speaks, Feeding America, Wounded Warrior Project, and lots more! 

Share the Moments in REAL Time

One of my favorite features of the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Plus I’m test-driving as a part of the Verizon Wireless Buzz crew, is the live stream video ability. Most of my family lives on the west coast, I’m on the east. We miss out on sharing so many of the milestones and moments of life just because of geography.

This feature allows me to text a link to my parents and have them join in LIVE at the kiddo’s violin recital, in the kitchen while I’m trying to make one of my mom’s signature recipes, at the big game. Unlike Periscope, this is a private stream only shared with those that have the invite. I can also download the video to my private YouTube channel and keep it like a video scrapbook.

Share A Meal

A meal has always been my favorite way to connect with others. Somehow feeding the belly, can also feed the soul. Though the Meal Sharing isn’t an app or charity, it does bring people together.

Go to the website, sign up and then search for meals being prepared by gifted home cooks. Find one that appeal to you, pay on the site and then show up to eat. Maybe bring along gift for the host or ask if you can donate to a food bank in their area. 

Giving Tuesday

The UN Foundation has put kindness and giving back into the holiday season with their Giving Tuesday campaign. In a time where Cyber Monday and Black Friday dominate the season,

#GivingTuesday, is a global day dedicated to giving back. On Tuesday, December 1, 2015, charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.

It’s a simple idea and a powerful thing to do. Gather your family, community, coworkers and come together to give something more.  It can be something as simple as donating to your local homeless shelter or as big as hosting a day of community service where you get everyone involved. Tech plays a big role in Giving Tuesday, by connecting people, sharing plans, and getting others involved.

A rising tide floats all boats.

Text It

Remember when you were a kid and something unexpected came in the mail for you? That thrill was a powerful thing. In the busy lives we lead it may not be practical to sit down and write a note, find a stamp, and hit the post office. BUT  a random text out of the blue? That we can do!

Try it this week. Pick two new people a day to send a text to. Make it fun, happy, appreciative, silly, whatever fits your relationship with that person. I’d wager by the end of the week you’ll be smiling and so will a bunch of people you care about. 

How about that for the power of kindness when it meets tech?

Verizon gives some great ideas on how you can use tech to do random acts of kindness any day, for any reason. Join in using technology for good this month and spread the word using the hashtag #VZWBuzz, let’s make kindness a thing! Okay, an even bigger thing.

 

Disclosure: As member of a pretty cool team of influencers, I occasionally receive cool products to test drive and share my honest thoughts on. No additional compensation is provided, neither were any favorable comments promised.  All opinions are my own.