Category Archives: hiking

Caption This: Giveaway

I take too many pictures. There, I’ve confessed. Now that we have that out of the way I’ll make my case for why I feel that, in fact, there is no such thing. 

Snapping away on a recent hike in Maryland’s Patapsco Valley this gem made the roll. It was in a burst series I was using in hopes of getting the damn dog to look at me. As the song goes; you can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometimes you just might find you get what you need. 

I needed this laugh. Now I need a caption for the image. That’s where you come in. 

Help me find a great caption for this one and I’ll treat you to what you might need… like a $10 Starbucks gift card. Leave as many comments as you’d like. Each will be an entry. Let’s have some fun and laugh together! 

 

Great Smoky Mountains in Pictures (by a 9-year-old)

The Great Smoky Mountains in Pictures (taken by a 9 year old) Leave only footprints. Take only memories. A motto that accompanies the wandering spirit. I’d only make one small tweak to it. Take photos. Lots of them, taken by lots of people. 

That lots of people clause is key. None of us see things exactly the same way. Put a camera into the hands of someone else and your whole experience changes. Light reflects differently. Angles transform and small details give new meaning to the memories.

About a year ago my youngest asked to start taking pictures with my phone. Not able to part with that piece of codependent technology at the time, instead I let her use an old point-and-shoot. She had a blast. There may not have been many ‘usable’ images but remember this is about perspective changes. Those early photos gave me a whole new perspective on the cat’s toes.

Flash forward a year and she’s moved through an old-school-style instamatic, her own point-and-shoot, and the occasional borrowing of a smart phone. What she loves most though is mom’s Cannon Rebel.

After toying around with it in Coney Island, during the Cherry Blossom Festival, and several trips to the park, she felt ready to move onto bigger things. Like shooting photos near water. Gulp!

Our most recent trip was to the hills of Tennessee. I took a deep breath, and leap of faith {lord, please don’t drop it in a creek!} and turned it over to her on a hike up to Alum Cave.

Never one to subscribe to the less-is-more theory, she shot over 275 pictures. I’ll take partial blame for that though as I never told her to just push one button and not fiddle with anything else. Turns out the fiddling actually allowed her to  capture some great shots. Though I doubt her older siblings will appreciate the clarity of some of the faces they were making – or that time one was smacking the other with a tree branch.   

Great Smoky Mountains in Pictures (taken by a 9 year old) When we went over the shots to pick the best for saving, she asked if I’d put her pictures in my post about the trip. I think her photos worthy of their own post entirely. I give you The Great Smoky Mountains as photographed by Em.

Great Smoky Mountains in Pictures (by a 9-year-old)


Summer in a Ski Town – The Resort at Squaw Creek, Lake Tahoe

Gorgeous views from the lobby of TheResort at Squaw CreekIt may seem odd to think about visiting a destination best known for world-class skiing when the only snow you’re likely to find is in a cone.  As it turns out some ski towns have nearly as much to offer in the summer. The Resort at Squaw Creek, Lake Tahoe makes for a great base camp to test that theory. 

The Resort at Squaw Creek, Lake Tahoe

All about the lake – Nestled in the Sierra Nevada mountains, Lake Tahoe itself is the largest Alpine lake in North America. Boating, kayaking, and stand-up paddle boarding are just a few of the ways to enjoy this stunning natural wonder with water so clear in some spots that you can see to a depth of around 70 feet.  At times it reminded me of the waters off the east coast of Jamaica.

(photo credit: Squaw Valley Lodge / CC BY-SA 2.0)
(photo credit: Squaw Valley Lodge / CC BY-SA 2.0)

What is there to actually do at a ski resort in summer?

The simple answer? Lots!

Hike through stunning mountainsides dotted with waterfalls, hidden lakes, and a rainbow of beautiful wild flowers. 

Waterfall on the Shirley Canyon Hiking Trail - Lake TahoeTake an aerial tram ride up 2,000 vertical feet to High Camp where a pool, museum, outdoor activities, bar and cafe await with stunning views from an elevation of 8,200 feet. 

Go horseback riding on trails that cross streams and wind up into the mountains giving breath-taking views of protected forest ranges. Who knows, you might even run into a local or two. We met up with a Black Tail deer who could have cared less that we were there, she was so busy munching.

Horseback riding at Alpine Meadows - Lake TahoeOr, you could just hang out by the pool. The Resort at Squaw Creek has large recreation pool, plunge pool, 120-foot water slide, a children’s pool and 3 outdoor all-season whirlpools.

Worked up an appetite? The food scene at Lake Tahoe holds its own with the well-developed tastes of Foodies visiting from the San Francisco bay area. The Resort at Squaw Creek boasts three eateries open year-round, as well as two open seasonally.

Stop in for breakfast at Cascades and indulge in a buffet that features great artisanial eats like local honey, cheeses, and pastries. Don’t miss the build-your-own Bloody Mary Bar. 

Build-Your-Own Bloody Mary BarHave Sweet Potatoes Deli box you up a lunch for your outdoor adventures. Their quinoa and tomato salad is sublime.

Signature cocktails share center stage with gorgeous views, and innovated, gourmet dishes at Six Peaks Grille. Fine dining by the fire? I’m in.

Crispy Duck with Blueberry Confit - Six Peaks Grille at The Resort at Squaw Creek, Lake TahoeThe Spa, aaah! In my mind no hotel property should be allowed to call itself a resort if they don’t have a great spa. Squaw Creek earns their “resort” cred with a spa that Condé Nast Traveler named among the Top Five Resort Spas. 

It may not be the biggest, but it melds perfectly into the “nature vibe” of the area making the experience immersive, and unique. I thoroughly enjoyed their Coconut/Honey Sugar Scrub treatment, and highly recommend asking if Norma-Jean has any openings when you book any treatment at the spa.

How are the rooms? It just so happened that during my visit The Resort at Squaw Creek was celebrating it’s 25th anniversary by getting some work done. Rooms are in the process of being updated with modern amenities, like: marble tiled bathrooms with separate soaking tubs and separate showers, and chic resort decor. The rooms are actually more like micro-apartments with a kitchen stocked with utensils, appliances and tableware, making them great for families.

I will say that the refrigerator in my room was odd. The shelves were so narrow that you couldn’t fit a full-sized wine or soft drink bottle in without laying it flat.  

The Resort at Squaw Creek - Renovated RoomThe renovations are being done in two stages, the first complete already with the rest expected to be finished by the time ski season arrives. I’d suggest calling the property to book your room so you can request one that has been updated.

Tips

If you’re flying in from the East Coast, consider departing from New York if you can. JetBlue has recently opened up a non-stop route from JFK to Reno.

The Resort at Squaw Creek is about an hour drive from the Reno airport. Don’t bother renting a car, there is shuttle service from the resort to just about anywhere you want to go. Instead, make a reservation with Sierra-Tahoe Car Service.  Not only will you get a reliable ride in a full-sized SUV with room for your family and gear, you’ll also be able to take in the sites on the scenic drive up to the resort.

The holidays are a great time to stay at the resort. In fact, there are some great sales coming up just for that time of year.  They won’t be advertizing these prices so be sure you’re in the know by signing up for info

Sunset on Lake Tahoe

 

As you know, sometimes I get the opportunity to visit places as a hosted guest of the destination. I was hosted on this trip. That said, I received no compensation and was not required to write a review of any sort. Everything you just read is 100% my honest opinion, because you deserve nothing less!  

 

Forest Bathing? Yes, It’s A Thing

Sedona Arizona Snoopy RockSometimes writing about travel does more for funny bone than the two-hundred bucks you paid to go see Lewis Black live at Constitution Hall. Okay, that might be a slight exaggeration. Only the most humorless amongst us can stay straight faced when pitched content for a, “Luxury Survivalist Excursion.”

Some days my inbox is like an episode of Laugh In. Rowan and Martin tossing one-liners at ya… “Come to our Echo Lodge – We’ll let you bring your favorite toilet paper, or we’ll point you to the bushes with best leaves.” So, when an email with the title, “Forest Bathing now available to travelers in Sedona, Arizona.” my first thought was… Sock It To Me!

Two questions immediately followed the giggle;

1. Was bathing in the forest somehow not available before this? Like was there an ordnance?
2. Is the plumbing in this hotel undergoing renovation?

I make it a point to at least skim over every pitch I get. I know how painful writing the darn things is – respect must be paid. As I read this one  it quickly became apparent that the author was a genius in writing an email title with a great hook, and that Forest Bathing was not – as I’d believed, and perhaps secretly hoped  – a bunch of people lathering up with pine sap soap and bark loofahs.

Forest Bathing Sedona Arizona

Forest Bathing, also know as “Shinrin-Yoku,” draws on the traditions of mindfulness and is rooted in a range of transcultural practices that recognize the benefits that time in nature can have a positive and healing effect on human health and happiness. (happiness – I can get behind that)

L’Auberge de Sedona, has just introduced an expert-led Forest Bathing program, designed to help guests connect with nature on a greater level by inviting them to experience their surroundings in new ways. Located along the famed Oak Creek and Coconino National Forest, and nestled within the enchanting Red Rocks of Sedona, Arizona, the property has long been a destination sought after for the naturally healing benefits of its environment. 

From healing invitations, to practicing gratitude – L’Auberge de Sedona’s creekside location provides the perfect arena for guests to take a step back and re-connect with the earth and themselves. Guests will be led by certified forest bathing experts at the resort on a gentle, guided walk along the Oak Creek, that will support well-being through sensory immersion in the naturally healing environment.

They say that laughter is the best medicine, I’m thinking a Forest Bath might be fairly medicinal as well.

Hotel Information

L’Auberge de Sedona 〉 301 Little Ln, Sedona, AZ 86336 〉 (800) 905-5745 〉 website www.lauberge.com

Amenity Information

Complimentary to guests. Private sessions available for $195 per person.

Photo Credit: L’Aburge de Sedona