Category Archives: recipes

Chicken Soup Recipes from Around the Globe

Chicken Soup Recipes from Around the GlobeThis year in preparation for cold and flu season, I decided to get ahead of the germs and cook my own penicillin. Okay, maybe it was more a Pinterest endeavor than a petri dish thing, but I think that soup might have it’s own curative cultures. I’m not alone in that theory. Turns out soup is “prescribed” rather universally. Here is a sampling of chicken soup recipes from around the globe. 

Cilantro is one of those flavors that you either love or hate. I’m no hater. So this Peruvian recipe – from Nutrients, You Fools {best. food. blog. name. ever}  which is packed with the stuff really appealed to me.  The pungent aroma is great for the sinuses too. I substituted olive oil for the butter though and tossed in a bit more garlic. 

Chicken Soup Recipes from around the globe
photo credit: nutrientsyoufools.com


Over the last couple of years I’ve been exploring Persian cooking. I love the heady aroma this spice-laden cooking and the vibrant colors that come from the use of turmeric, paprika, and saffron. Fittingly this next recipe comes from a blog called, Turmeric & Saffron. 

Barley is the surprise ingredient in Soup-e Jo, a Persian chicken soup that is rich, hearty, colorful and has just a bit of tang to it.

Chicken Soup Recipes from Around the Globe
photo credit: turmericsaffron.blogspot.com

No proper post on chicken soup would be worth it’s salt without some “Jewish Penicillin” better known as Mazto Ball Soup. This soup is an art form, as such there are many shades and variations.  

Some prefer their Mazto in a dainty bite size, others {me included} like to dig into a giant ball of yum floating in a sea of flavor. There are those that shun the dill and some who simply won’t stand for anything other than a crystal clear broth. One thing we can all agree on though, is if you’re sick a good Mazto Ball soup is as necessary as rest and a warm blanket.  

I’ll admit that I’ve never mastered the art of making the stuff, sad to say. I do have masterful ordering skills though and luckily the famed Chick & Ruth’s Annapolis delivers! I may have to give this recipe from Girl and The Kitchen ago. It as everything I consider high-art in a Mazto Ball soup. 

Chicken Soup Reicpes from Around the Globe
photo credit: girlandthekitchen.com

One of the things I loved most about Greece is the abundance of lemon. If tooth enamel were not a necessary thing, I think I could just live off lemons alone. While Greek seafood will always been my favorite, this recipe for Greek Lemon Chicken Soup from A Family Feast is sunshine in a bowl – the perfect pick-me-up for when you’re feeling under the weather. 

A bonus here, the stock recipe included in this post is phenomenal. I made two batches of it last month, canned and froze some. Having homemade stock for cold and flu season is like adding to your medicine cabinet. Do it. It is well worth the time and effort.

Chicken Soup Recipes from Around the World
photo credit: afamilyfeast.com

While I was putting together this post…

I. Got. Sick.

Isn’t that just how it works, eh? One stroke of luck though, I found some of my dad’s famous Albondigas Soup made with chicken meatballs in our deep freezer.  I credit the spicy soup filled with squash, carrots, potatoes, and rice with my quick recovery. Maybe we can all guilt him into revealing his secret recipe.

Have a favorite chicken soup recipe with a global twist? I’d love to add it to this list. 

One Pan Spanish Roasted Chicken (Recipe)

What happens when you post a yummy picture on Instagram? You get tons of requests for the recipe. This weekend I posted a photo of my One Pan Spanish Roasted Chicken – with a twist. Guess what… people wanted the recipe. So this is for them, maybe you’ll like it too!

One Pan Spanish Roasted ChickenOne of my favorite things about fall is that you can turn the oven make on. Nothing like coming home to a house filled with the aromas of slow cooked food or baking – man, now I want brownies!

I’m working on cutting salt from our diets here at Casa DiPaola, and this recipe was the first one of our favorites that I revamped. I learned to make it back when I was living in Spain and recalled that the original recipe had very little salt in it. I thought that made it a perfect candidate for a makeover. 

I punched up the flavor with a spicier paprika that I typically use, and added in some whole Fenugreek and Grains of Paradise.   Fenugreek {which you can find in most spice shops or at places like World Marketone} has a slightly sweet flavor, when roasted it develops a warm nutty profile.  You might recognize a bit of its flavor from your favorite curry.

Grains of Paradise are… well… paradise. These tiny little pods pack a spicy, nutty flavor with earthy hints of an almost morel mushroom taste. When you roast with them, they bloom into something that reminds me of hiking in the truffled forests of Aragon.  Which is funny for a spice that hails from West Africa. When they mingle with the juices from pan, the saffron and thyme, then get embedded in a cube of bread that is both crunchy and chewy… well again, paradise.

Do you have favorite spices that can take the place of salt? I’d LOVE to hear about them!

One Pan Spanish Roasted Chicken
Serves 4
An easy one pan dinner packed with bold flavor. Toasty bread soaked in the juices makes it a meal. Easy to adapt to nearly any protein.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
50 min
Total Time
1 hr
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
50 min
Total Time
1 hr
Ingredients
  1. 4 Chicken Breasts (skin on, bone in) - can also use legs and/or thighs
  2. 1 Head of Garlic (large)
  3. 1 Leek
  4. 1 Spanish Onion
  5. 5 Sprigs of Thyme
  6. 1 Loaf of Crusty Bread
  7. 5-8 Threads of Saffron
  8. 1/4 Cup Olive Oil
  9. 1 tbsp Black Pepper
  10. 1 tbsp Smoked Paprika (mild or spicy)
  11. 1 tbsp Garlic Powder
  12. 1/4 tsp Nutmeg
  13. (optional)
  14. 1 tsp Grains of Paradise
  15. 1 tsp Fenugreek
  16. 1 tsp Sea Salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.Tear bread into bite-sized cubes. Peel onion, and quarter leaving stem on to help the pieces together. Remove dark green portions of the leek, and the stem end. Half then quarter. Slice entire head of garlic in half. Place all into your roasting pan. Mix half spices with olive oil, pour over ingredients in pan and toss to coat.
  2. Arrange items in pan, intersperse chicken among them skin side up. Take remaining spice mixture and rub into the chicken skin. Place on center rack in the oven and bake for 50 minutes, or until the internal temperature reads 160 degrees Fahrenheit.
Notes
  1. Yes, salt is intentionally omitted from this recipe. The flavors are so bold, that I've found salt unnecessary. Feel free to salt to your taste if so desired.
Chicken Nuggets of Wisdom http://chickennuggetsofwisdom.com/

Homemade Limoncello Recipe

For years pals {of both the real and interwebs varieties} have been asking me to share my homemade limoncello recipe. It’s not that my Limoncello is so fancy, or that the recipe is a tightly guarded secret. The fact is I’m mostly just lazy. 

Homemade Limoncello RecipeI’ve finally transferred the info from the tattered piece of paper I stuff in my copy of Marcella Hazan’s Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, to the Slightly Tipsy Facebook page… and now HERE. There are any number of limoncello recipes out there. I’ve tweaked mine a few times over the years, but it’s always remained really simple.

We make two large batches a year. One to stock our bar with {for the year, don’t judge} and one for gifting. Other than cash, not much else beats handcrafted hooch in the gift department. Enjoy!

Homemade Limoncello Recipe

8-10 Lemons {I prefer Meyer for flavor & color}
5 Cups Filtered Water
3 1/2 Cups Superfine Sugar {or pulse regular sugar in a food processor}
1 Quart of Vodka {or any clear grain alcohol}

Remove zest from lemons. Be SURE not to get too much of the icky {totally a technical term} white pith in there. Place in an airtight container. Pour vodka in. Seal and store in a dry, dark place for 6 days. On the 7th day, combine water and sugar. Bring to a low boil until sugar is dissolved. BOOM! You’ve got simple syrup. Add that to your lemon peel and vodka concoction. Place back in your storage spot for 2-4 more days.

Remove lemon peels. Strain that sunshiny hooch through a fine sieve. With a funnel, fill smaller {prettier} bottles with your awesome Limoncello.

Once you’ve mastered this homemade limoncello recipe {or even before you have} come stop by the Slightly Tipsy website. It’s a fun place where I get to hang out with some of my favorite people and fellow cocktail  aficionados. 

The Language of Food (plus a giveaway)

I think James Beard put it best when he said, “Food is our common ground, a universal experience.” In my travels across the globe there has been but one constant – food is the key to understanding.

Recipes are historical notations to the lives we live, a connection to those that came before us. A meal prepared and shared with others ensures that a piece of our story is passed on. On my recent trip to Jamaica as a guest of the Jamaican Tourism Board, I had the privilege to share a meal with Robin Lim Lumsden, author of “Belcour: Jamaican, French & Chinese Family Recipes for Entertaining.”

Belcour: Jamican, French and Chinese Family Recipes for Entertaining The title itself hints at what an amazing story Robin tells with food. Jamaican of Scottish, Chinese, French and English descent, who also spent time living in Chicago, Robin herself is the proverbial melting pot. Alongside beautifully photographed dishes in the book, you’ll also find family photographs going back generations. Some tell the story of her family’s contribution to the founding of Jamaica’s iconic Red Stripe brewery, others chronicle the journey that brought her to Belcour and it’s own transformation from estate to an organic farm that produces many of the ingredients found in Belcour Preserves.Yogurt and Stewed GuavaOver a dish of fresh yogurt topped stewed guava, I began to develop a bit of a girl-crush on Robin. She has all the swagger of Bourdain, the approachability of Nigella, and subscribes to a Hemingway-esque philosophy that any meal is made better with a tot of scotch – for the cook!

In every dish she made for us there were tales of love, notes of bittersweet memory, a salting of pride and joy, all with healthy sprinkling of laughter. With each bite, Belcour became a part of me. Leaving, even after having only been there for a few hours, was difficult. I know I will go back.

Lilly Pond at Belcour LodgeFor the time being, I visit Belcour by making some of the dishes in her cookbook. My family has a tradition of sharing Sunday brunch, most often at home. Honestly this is mostly so I can only cook once on Sundays! When I got back from Jamaica it seemed only fitting to make a Robin-inspired meal.

Ackee and Saltfish auicheThe book has an entire section dedicated to brunch!

My sister-in-spice, Julie Cohn from “A Little Bite of Life” and I want you to cook up a story or two (okay, all the stories) from Robin’s book. Below you can enter to win a copy of the award-winning, stunning, one-of-a-kind… “Belcour: Jamaican, French & Chinese Family Recipes for Entertaining” And just in time for holiday entertaining season!

Be sure to visit A Little Bite of Life for extra entries AND my twist on Robin’s Crab Cakes with Mango. Yum!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Disclosure: I was a guest of the Jamaican Tourism Board for a culinary trip around the island. All opinions are my own, I was not compensated for this post. I purchased the prize(s) myself, because I truly want to share them with you!  

Simple Steps for a Spooky Halloween Feast

Simple, Spooky, Halloween Feast It’s the most wonderful time of the year. Pumpkins for roasting, blood cocktails for toasting and headstones aglow in the yard. You can keep your jingle bells and turkey dinners, give me banshees and the undead any day. Halloween is my thing. The Samhain celebration in our house always starts with a ghoulish feast – no goulash involved. Hosting a ghostly get-together can be scary simple. Here are a few of my go-to tips for creating a Spooky Halloween Feast .   

Tip #1: Hit the Dollar Stores

I love to peruse those pop-up Halloween shops and warehouses, but I rarely buy there. For the most part they’re just totally over priced. Many of the things you’ll find there can be reproduced with thrifty finds from the Dollar Store or even a thrift shop. Save your money for the big scares.

Tip #2: Raid the Good China

That silver service Gran left ya – the one that’s been gathering tarnish (or patina, if you’re fancy) will lend a great vintage-creepy vibe to your tablescape. Using mismatch serving dishes, old candle holders and turning a glass bowl upside down to replace a cloche are free and up the freaky factor. Mix and match some of the cool paper goods you can find at Target with your fancy chargers or good china. These are all easy and CHEAP tricks for creating that scary-chic setting.

Tip #3: A Dish by Any Other Name

 Castelvetrano Olives are a salty Sicilian treat found on many a fancy charcuterie plate. Put them in a brass bowl perched atop a pair of claw hands and their nearly-neon hue makes them instant, “Eye of Newt.” Mashed potatoes and meatloaf, peeled grapes, jelly donuts with dripping raspberry jam, sun-dried tomatoes and cheese baked in puff pastry, pomegranate punch with a splash of lime grenadine, all sound simply delish. Yes? Call them Roasted Brains, Stuffed Intestines, Nosferatu Choux  and Blood Bath Bubbly, and you have devilishly deviant deliciousness.  

Tip #4: Raid the Craft and Supply Stores

Pass by the Halloween displays at the craft store, or only shop them if you have that 40% off coupon, but still go. There are some great finds in the floral, fabric, and jewelery-supply sections. Feathers and Spanish Moss, tulle in All Hallows Eve hues, and baubles like vintage-style keys, cameo charms and crystals of all colors lend a chill to the air of your tablescape. Cheap skulls of all shapes, sizes, and colors carry the theme throughout too.

spooky tablescape on the cheapOn-line science and industrial supply stores are a veritable wonderland of macabre just waiting to happen. Beakers, flasks, and test tubes… OH MY! A Boston Round bottle with a handwritten, “poison label” does great double duty as a prop in Dr. Jekyll’s laboratory. I picked up a 12 pack of test tubes for less than five bucks.  Fill them with dipping sauces. and give them grotesque labels and you’ve got a party. 

Here are a couple of simple recipes to take your spine-chillingly Spooky Halloween Feast over the top.

meatloaf brains a tasty halloween meat treat

Ingredients:
1 pound ground beef
1/2 pound ground pork
1 egg
1/2 cup bread crumbs
1 tbsp garlic powder
1 tbsp Trader Joe’s Season-All
2 tbsp onion (minced)
Your Favorite Mashed Potatoes
1/2 cup tomato puree
2 pastry bags

Prep Time:

Cook Time:
Serves: 6

Directions:
Mix meats with garlic, season-all, onion, egg and bread crumbs. Form into 12 balls about the size of your palm. Roll on a parchment covered surface to get an oblong shape. Press two together firmly, six sets in total. Place on a lined baking sheet in a 450 degree oven for 20-25 minutes until cooked through. In the mean time prepare mashed potatoes. Be sure they are not too loose.

Allow potatoes to cool until cool enough to handle. Fill a pastry bag with potatoes. Pipe onto meatloaf “brains” in a zigzag pattern. Fill second pastry bag with tomato puree. Pipe onto potato layer inside of the grooves, nooks and crannies. 

Note: Barbecue sauce and steak sauce make tasty substitutions for tomato puree. 

Puff Pastry Cheese and Sundried Tomato - Tasty Intestines

Ingredients:
1 package frozen puff pastry sheets (thawed, but kept chilled)
2 cups shredded Italian cheese blend
1 package cream cheese (room temperature)
1 tbsp dried Italian herbs
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp cracked black pepper
3-4 sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil (oil drained and patted off)
Egg wash (1 egg beaten with a tablespoon of water)
 

Prep Time: 15

Cook Time: 15
Serves: 6-8

Directions:
In a medium mixing bowl combine cheeses, herbs and seasonings. Dice tomatoes and add to cheese mixture. Set aside.

Roll out sheet of puff pastry on a loured surface till it is a rough circle approximately 10 inches in diameter. It does not need to be a perfect circle, in fact the less perfect the better.
Spread cheese and tomato mixture 1/2 inch in from one side of the pastry dough. Fold over the edge of the dough until it covers most of the cheese mixture. Working from right to left, roll the dough over itself forming a cigar shaped roll. Coil onto a lined baking sheet in roughly the shape of an intestine (yeah, I know it sounds nasty but it tastes good.) Brush the top with egg wash. Bake in a 375 degree oven for 15 minutes, or until golden brown and bubbly. Serve with a sharp knife for hacking into… YUCKY YUMMY!