Category Archives: give back

Lessons from Dogs

It was a cold and dreary one along the Chesapeake Bay. The weather brought with it a bit of unease and melancholia. I often find that spending some time alone with my dog on days like these helps ease some of that grayness.

Just me and the pup, that day. The kids had slept late and my husband didn’t feel like going out in the rain.

While feeding the ducks from the red brick lined sidewalk, a man approached. He asked if he could pet my dog. Gordon loves that, little attention junkie that he is.

While the dog did all his cute moves to get more scratches behind the ear, the man shared how much he loved being around dogs.  “Dogs never think twice about being nice. They seem to know if they are good to you, you’ll be nice back. Sad that doesn’t always work out for them.”

He thanked me, rubbed Gordy’s head and walked away only to turn around and head back. Gordon responded with an earnest shimmy of his tiny tail-nub.

With a shyness in his eyes, he said he hated to ask but he was homeless and hungry and wondered if I had some change to spare. Without thinking twice I handed him the only cash I had with me, a twenty.

I tend to be very wary of panhandlers having seen more than one head off for a fix. He could have been intending to do the same thing but I realized in that moment it wasn’t my place to judge. I could do a nice thing because it was nice and leave it at that. I could remember the lessons from dogs… and not think twice about being nice.

A dog doesn’t care if you’re rich or poor, educated or illiterate, clever or dull. Give him your heart and he will give you his. ~ John Grogan

Heading back to the car I heard someone call, “Hey, Gordon’s mom!” I looked across the street and it was the same guy with a big bag full of sandwiches from a local shop down the street.

He beamed at me and said, “thanks for understanding.” Sometimes the lessons from dogs are the ones that teach us how to be better humans. 

Be The Good: Talking Philanthropy with Laurie Kelley

I’ve long held the idea that whenever I have the opportunity to choose to do good, I do it. Okay, I realize that isn’t exactly a novel idea. After all, wouldn’t all choose that? So, I guess what we’re really talking about are new ideas for impactful ways to do good, starting with healthcare. To make my point I’ve enlisted the help of an expert. Today we’ll be talking philanthropy with Laurie Kelly, President & Chief Philanthropy Officer, Providence Foundations of Oregon Chair and the  Providence St. Joseph Health Philanthropy Executive Council.

Laurie was able to help me understand what philanthropy in the healthcare field looks like. Sometimes it is community outreach for mental health programs, other times it’s about matching funding to programs in need – think things like cancer research.

Even working in the medical arena, I was unaware that groups like the Providence Foundation existed and did so much. Let’s let Laurie tell us just how much.

Not all medical centers have an arm that addresses community need through philanthropy, why has Providence chosen to?

Philanthropy has been a part of Providence’s history since the very beginning when the Sisters would go on their “begging tours” to build new schools and hospitals.  Over the years, philanthropy has been the lynchpin that moves Providence from being a very good place for care to being an excellent place for care. Philanthropy is the secret sauce that makes such a difference in funding programs for the poor and vulnerable, for furthering research, for establishing new programs, creating new spaces for patients, sometimes even entirely new buildings, and funding many positions.  With reimbursements declining and margins eroding, we will rely even more on philanthropy to provide funding for things that cannot be covered by patient revenue. We always try to match the funding need with a donor’s passion. We also realize that everyone who wants to be involved with us has different levels of resources. We value every gift.

How does the foundation work?

Oregon has 10 foundations representing our eight hospitals, a nursing center and our children’s programs (which has expanded from a foundation serving the Providence Child Center for Medically Fragile Children.)  Each foundation has an executive director and is a 501 c 3 non-profit organization with a board of directors. We work with leaders at each of the organizations to identify programs that need additional funding support.  Then we determine whether that request might appeal to a pool of donors. Every year, the foundations return tens of millions of dollars back to the ministries in our region.

What types of needs are met through the foundation’s work? Can you share a story or two about those who have been helped through the efforts of Providence?

There are so many examples.  This year, there was a need to expand behavioral health for adolescents.  The project appealed to several donors and was able to be funded. The research within our world-renowned Providence Cancer Institute is 70% funded by donors.  Simply put, without donors, we would not have a cancer research institute. The Providence Heart Institute has risen to all new levels of care, hired new doctors, established may new programs including CARDS, (the Center for Cardiovascular Analytics Research & Data Science) and additionally, we have beautiful new space for our caregivers and, more importantly, our patients and families.  There are literally thousands of things happening annually at Providence Oregon because of the generosity of our community.

How can the public get involved in the mission of the foundation?

Check out our website www.providencefoundations.org  See if there are ministries, programs or impact areas that are of interest to you.  Volunteer to work at one of our events, attend one of our fundraisers, contact our executive directors and see if there are openings on our boards, let us know if there is a grateful patient or family you know who might want to make a gift to recognize the care they received and spread the word about the positive work made possible by the generosity of others, and if it fits in your budget, make a gift to an area that matters to you.

With so much need out there, how does the foundation prioritize its efforts?

We work with our regional administrative and clinical leaders to identify priorities for funding.  In addition through our Community Health Division, Providence hospitals conduct Community Health Needs Assessments every few years to identify the top prioritized needs in our communities. Most often these needs include social determinates of health such as food insecurity or housing, as well as behavioral health needs, substance use and also access to health care. The CHNA is an important tool to guide all Providence programs, partnerships and investments across the organization according to greatest community need.

I’ve spent time volunteering in a NICU. How do your Specialty Pediatric clinics differ or mirror something like that?

While we do not have a children’s hospital, we care for more children than anyone in the state.  Twenty percent of all babies born in Oregon are born at a Providence Hospital. We offer a wide range of services for children with developmental issues, as well we offer many pediatric psychiatric services.  The Children’s Developmental Clinic and Swindells Clinic are much-needed services in our community. Many of these needed services requiring philanthropic support continue to exist because reimbursements do not cover their full costs and generous donors keep these services going.

How do the uninsured or underinsured go about exploring the services offered at your facilities?   

While the foundation is unable to help patients pay for our services, you can call or visit a financial counselor or billing office at your local Providence facility. We can give you any forms you need and can help you apply for assistance. Patients can also apply at any time while receiving treatment and anytime during the billing process. If possible, patients are strongly encouraged to ask for financial help before receiving medical treatment.

If someone wanted to learn more about the Providence Foundations, both how they can help or avail themselves of the services provided, how should they do that? If someone isn’t in an area that the Foundation serves, is there a standard way to find out if medical centers in their communities have philanthropic arms like Providence? 

You can research a lot of our work on our website, www.providencefoundations.org or contact members of our team.  Nearly every foundation connected with a hospital has a website, that would be a way to discover more about any foundations in your service area.  

I’d like to thank Laurie for taking the time to share how the foundation she heads up finds these impactful ways to do good.  She is one busy lady as the mom of four, grandmother of wins, and occasional author for Working Mother and LinkedIn.  

photo courtesy of Providence Foundation

 

This story was written as part of a paid partnership with Providence St. Joseph Health. I was honored to get a few minutes of Laurie’s time in order to help illustrate how philanthropy can have an impact on health care as well as in our communities. If you’d like to know more about the Providence Foundation, feel free to visit their website or follow them Facebook.

 

 

Giving Tuesday & Tech

random acts of kindness there's an app for that

I first published this post back in 2015 when Giving Tuesday was in its early days. Today I was able to find over a dozen new organizations to give back to just by searing  #GivingTuesday on social media. I love it when we can come together as humans and put the tech that surrounds us every day to GOOD use. If you sport a charity and want to share, feel free to leave a comment. I will share those organizations on social media. Kindness matters.  

Kindness is the best investment. Think about it, how good do you feel right after you’ve done something – big or small-– for someone else? See, just thinking about it paid dividends in you feel good all over again. Right? Giving back with kindness is even easier thanks to tech. Check out these ways random acts of kindness apps, websites and tech tools. 

Walk The Dog

I love this one because it has so many layers. Walking your dog is good for you and them. With Walk for a Dog, Woof Trax is making it your walk good for dogs living in shelters too.

Whether it’s a walk around the block or that epic hike you’ve been gearing up for every walk counts. Download their app, and use it every time you grab for the leash, and Woof Trax donates to one of 6,000 shelters across the country!

Get Those Steps In

Sure, hitting your daily steps goal is great but it can do good for others too. Charity Miles partners with corporate sponsors to make those steps add up to cold hard cash for charity.  Just download the app, fill out your profile and get moving. Bikers earn up to 10¢ per mile; walkers and runners earn up to 25¢ per mile, and it all goes to the cause of your choosing from a long list of participating organizations.

So what charities can you help by getting in your daily workout? Organizations like; Habitat for Humanity, (red), Autism Speaks, Feeding America, Wounded Warrior Project, and lots more! 

 

Share A Meal

A meal has always been my favorite way to connect with others. Somehow feeding the belly, can also feed the soul. Though the Meal Sharing isn’t an app or charity, it does bring people together.

Go to the website, sign up and then search for meals being prepared by gifted home cooks. Find one that appeals to you, pay on the site and then show up to eat. Maybe bring along a gift for the host or ask if you can donate to a food bank in their area. 

Giving Tuesday

The UN Foundation has put kindness and giving back into the holiday season with their Giving Tuesday campaign. In a time where Cyber Monday and Black Friday dominate the season,

#GivingTuesday, is a global day dedicated to giving back. On Tuesday, December 1, 2015, charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.

It’s a simple idea and a powerful thing to do. Gather your family, community, coworkers and come together to give something more.  It can be something as simple as donating to your local homeless shelter or as big as hosting a day of community service where you get everyone involved. Tech plays a big role in Giving Tuesday, by connecting people, sharing plans, and getting others involved.

A rising tide floats all boats.

 

what does it mean to be a global citizen?

What does it mean to be a Global Citizen?  Is it just about living in different places, exploring unfamiliar cultures? In an effort to understand the concept and how we may differ in defining it, I’ve asked for input from journalists and Reiki Masters, expats, veterans, an octogenarian and even a middle-schooler. Their answers may surprise you. 

I’ve long held a  belief in travel as a catalyst for transformation. But, often wonder if travel alone is what imbues one with a sense of contentedness. What I found in researching this piece is that travel is not necessarily the common thread, it may be something deeper. 

The following are unedited quotes given by a wide range of people, of varying ages with a tapestry of backgrounds and life experience. Some have never traveled beyond the borders of the United States, while others are global nomads. Is there a commonality in how they’ve responded to the question, “What does it mean to be a Global Citizen?”

What Does It Mean To Be A Global Citizen? 

 

“When you become a global citizen, you stop seeing people’s race and color, your home is where you are currently located, your interest in people’s culture and background is genuine and you sort of want to be a part of their experience. You stop judging people. Instead of judging, you ask such questions as “why they do things differently, why they eat different food, and wear different clothes, and behave differently in some situations.” As a citizen of the world, you look for similarities instead of differences, or try to tear down the borders instead of building them up; and then, at the end of it all, you realize how alike we all really are.”  

~ Svetlana G. (International businesswoman who has lived in Russia, Germany, Peru, Ukraine, and the US. Speaker of four languages, currently working on her fifth)

“My dad joined the military when I was 7, and it was the most important decision he ever made for our family. While the military generally skews conservative, it opened us up to experiencing people, places, religions, food, music, etc. we would never have had we stayed in Arkansas, where both my parents were born and raised. 

All that to say, being a global citizen isn’t just a progressive/liberal mindset. I’m extremely liberal now but grew up rather conservatively. Being a global citizen, at the very least, means being aware that there are other people, countries, religions, other than your own. Of course, a more progressive mindset takes it a step further, considering how the actions of our government and our own actions impact others. That is also the difference between being a global citizen and a GOOD global citizen.”

~ Brent A.  (Graphic Designer, advocate, author, blogger, husband and father) 

 “I’ve tried to teach my four kids that because they’re had access to great opportunity in the US doesn’t mean they’re entitled to success. And it certainly doesn’t mean that people who have had less opportunities are less worthy of succeeding. As the great Barry Switzer said, “Some people are born on third base and go through life thinking they hit a triple.” I try to instill a sense of gratitude, responsibility, and respect for all cultures.”

~ Lindsay M.  (Mom, DIYer, advocate, author, and wife of a musician) 

“A Global Citizen to me is someone who does not feel the boundaries of certain areas and has the sense of responsibility to be wary and cautious of the land and world around them. They know what needs to be done to take care of this world and they act upon it.” 

~ Tyler B. W. (Surfer, rapper, dog-dad, husband, and currently serving United States Marine)

“Having respect and compassion for people of different cultures within our borders and beyond. Recognizing that we are all of the same world and taking care of that earth and its occupants together.”

~ Julie C. (Journalist, travel expert, wife, mother and Doxie lover) 

“Global Citizenship means, connection. I have been blessed to travel and live in other countries, this has allowed me to experience different cultures and traditions.    I choose to believe that we are connected to each other by and invisible thread that I call God/Spirit.  We all share the same responsibility of nurturing and protecting the land/sea/air for future generations.  I have found although our traditions and cultures differ our consequences to this planet has an overall impact on the rest of us.”

~ Carolyn G. (Seeker, singer, mother, wife, former British expat now U.S. Citizen)

“Being in touch with the rest of the world and having concern/interest in all of our Human race brothers and sisters. None of us had a choice as to which country we would belong to when we were born.”

~ Robin R. (Manufacturing Executive, father, husband, mountain biker and veteran) 

“Global citizens feel at home in multiple locations as they roam the world, and feel the sense of belonging to others despite their cultural, racial, societal or economic or other differences. They thrive on learning new things and appreciate local cultures. At the same time – their own roots can weaken and their own cultural habits diminish as they learn and adapt to other cultures. At best global citizenship is when you teach your own culture to others as well learn from others.”

~ Katja P. (Author, Editor, expat, mother, influencer, photographer, entrepreneur, global nomad) 

“Sending aid to victims of the Mexican earthquake the same as you do the victims of Harvey or Irma. Feeling empathy towards the Palestinians and the various African people starving due to drought and war. Recognizing and celebrating the connectedness of all people from wherever they originate. And whatever your beliefs are about your creator and whatever the person on the exact opposite side of the planet (or city or state or country) believes about the creator, it is the same being. Remember that in dealing with your brothers and sisters from across the globe. And maybe someday from across the galaxy.”

~ Kevin H. (Financial planner, singer and husband)

“It means we are all on this big rock (Earth) together and we are all connected in some way even if it is only by the internet. It means knowing that we may not all agree but we will need each other at some point. Our differences can slip away over the common ground of a basic need of survival or compassion for one another. The only place that I have traveled out of the USA mainland is to Vieques, Puerto Rico. Having seen the beauty of the island and of the people, I am extremely concerned about the recent hurricanes they have been sustaining. How will this impact their way of life and the island. I am more connected having actually been there because I have first-hand knowledge of the kindness of the people who live there.

It is important not to be or become desensitized to others around the world because when we do, we become desensitized to our basic humanity.”

~ Beth F (Nurse, homeopathic wellness expert, Reiki Master) 

“It means one who is dedicated to stewardship of our planet while seeking education for them self and others through kindness and compassion.” 

~ Sarah Jane C.  (gardener, reader, enjoying life at 81 years young)

“It is when you care about people because they are people and the earth because we share it.” 

~ Emily D. (11-year-old traveler, lover of dance and her French Bulldog)

I came away from this little experiment in social consciousness with an unexpectedly profound revelation and more questions.  With such a diverse group it seemed logical that the responses would have a wide range. Yet, they really don’t. 

We seem to have an innate understanding of our own connection to one another and to our planet. Whether we’ve seen much of the world or rarely ventured beyond our hometown, we feel a sense of community in our shared humanity. But do we foster that connection, act on it, practice the understanding we have? If we don’t, why not?

In a time where so many forces seek to polarize or isolate, I see hope in our understanding of what it means to be a global citizen. With that said, I also wonder how we turn that knowledge into action. How do we move beyond answering the question and becoming true global citizens through action?  

This week I’m in New York city attending my second travel bloggers summit on study abroad and global citizenship. It is my hope to find ways – both big and small – that can help us all take meaningful action on behalf of each other. 

If you’d like to take part, follow along on social media using #StudyAbroadBecause 

don’t thank me for my service

Grills are firing up, traffic is piling up, and the cost of a mattress is dropping. It must mean that Memorial Day is nearly upon us. As you hang a flag or pack a bag I ask that you also remember what the day is intended to celebrate and… don’t thank me for my service. 

If you’ve read this blog much you may know that I’m a Navy veteran and the mother of a currently serving Marine. Causes that support veterans and service members are near and dear to my heart. You could say that one of the common threads in all of my storytelling is pulled from this experience. I feel it is my duty to raise a voice for my sisters and brothers at arms past, present, and future.

Memorial Day is one of the most misunderstood of the days set aside to honor those who serve. For example, did you know that it was first celebrated in 1868 as Decoration Day? No, it wasn’t the day Lilly Pulitzer’s ancestors created the first pineapple decorated sandal.  It was a day set aside to remember those lost in the civil war.

In 1971, amid war and loss, the day now known as Memorial Day became an official federal holiday intended to be a remembrance of those who had given all in service to this nation. Not all those that served but rather the countless many who had lost their lives for the freedoms we enjoy as citizens of these United States. 

Somewhere in the decades between we have let the solemnity of the day be pushed aside in favor of three-day weekends and the unofficial start of summer. Few of us find our way to places of mourning to pay respect to those whose blood has paved the path of our freedom. Still others of us, well-intentioned though we may be, misunderstand the sentiment of honoring loss and turn to thank the living for their service.   

While I appreciate your gratitude, a part of me rails against it on this day. I have lost those I knew, their loss is fresh again when you share thanks for my service on Memorial Day. I served. I did not die. This day is not for me, nor my son, nor my extended family of veterans and the currently serving Marines I consider family. It is for the families of the fallen, for the widow who sees flags fly on Memorial Day, each one of them an echo of a flag-draped coffin.  It is for the tears shed by loved ones across the decades that built this nation. It is a day of collective mourning and gratitude. 

Don’t misunderstand me, I am not here to tell you that you’re wrong in hosting that BBQ or heading to the beach. I just ask that you take a moment away from your celebrations to send one up in remembrance of those who gave all that you may truly enjoy this time together. 

If you’d like to thank a veteran, do that on Veteran’s Day. If you want to thank a currently serving member of any branch of our military (though we all know the Navy is the best,) Armed Forces Day is the day to do that. Should you be so inclined as to want to do more than just say thank you, support programs that help support our military and their families.  Here are a few of my favorites;

American Widow Project

Operation Delta Dog

Bob Woodruff Foundation

United Services Organization 

Operation Welcome Home (Maryland) 

Fisher House Foundation

Vail Veterans Project

Want to visit a veteran’s cemetery to say thank you? Here is a way to locate one near you.